Fairy Tale Friday-Ole Luk-Oie

This week’s fairy tale was Ole Luk Oie which is also known as Ole Lukøje. I thought I wasn’t going to know it, but it becamse very familiar. It is based upon the folk tale of the mysterious Sandman. Sandman takes children to sleep by sprinkling magic into their eyes. Depending on their behaviour, he shows them a range of dreams. If they have been good they see many beautiful dreams throughout the night. Those that aren’t good, get to sleep heavily, but they don’t dream a thing!

In the story Ole Lukøje we read about his visit to a boy called Hjalmar every night for a week. During his final visit, we read about Ole Lukøje’s brother who has the same name as him. We learn that he is also known as Death. Death  closes the eyes of those that visit and takes the child away with him.

This was a quaint little tale which I enjoyed reading. I now have Mr Sandman in my head for the rest of the day…

Next Fairy Tale- Soup From A Sausage Peg

It Ends With Us

It Ends with Us

How did I get it?:
I bought it!

Previously reviewed by the same author:

Slammed series

Hopeless duology 



Lily hasn’t always had it easy, but that’s never stopped her from working hard for the life she wants. She’s come a long way from the small town in Maine where she grew up – she graduated from college, moved to Boston, and started her own business. So when she feels a spark with a gorgeous neurosurgeon named Ryle Kincaid, everything in Lily’s life suddenly seems almost too good to be true.

Ryle is assertive, stubborn, and maybe even a little arrogant. He’s also sensitive, brilliant, and has a total soft spot for Lily, but Ryle’s complete aversion to relationships is disturbing.

As questions about her new relationship overwhelm her, so do thoughts of Atlas Corrigan – her first love and a link to the past she left behind. He was her kindred spirit, her protector. When Atlas suddenly reappears, everything Lily has built with Ryle is threatened.


As you can see, I’ve read a lot of Colleen Hoover’s books. I really enjoy her writing and find them easy to devour in no time at all. I was starting to think that Colleen’s books were getting a bit same-y (I still read them though!) so I was happy (seems the wrong word to use for this subject matter!) to read something a little different from Colleen. It Ends With Us contains some extremely heavy subject matter and some more adult characters.

I didn’t read a lot about It Ends With Us before I picked up the book. I tend to avoid reviews before I’ve read a book because I don’t want it to spoil the story. I don’t actually want to say much about the content of this book because I think it’s better not knowing about it before jumping in. If you do know, then I’d still urge you to read this book because I think it’s important. It certainly made an impact on me.

It Ends With Us begins with Lily Bloom meeting the highly attractive, if a little arrogant Ryle. Lily has an immediate attraction to him, but doesn’t think she’ll see him again. Lily is still very much thinking of Atlas, a homeless boy from her past. Through Lily’s letters to Ellen DeGeneres (that were never sent) we find out about Atlas and also secrets from Lily’s past.

It Ends With Us is definitely darker than you might expect. It may look like a sweet love story, and sure, there are sweet moments, but it’s a much darker story than I ever anticipated. There were several moments throughout the story that I found it hard to keep reading. I found Lily frustrating, I found Ryle frustrating. I just wanted to reach into the book and tell the characters a few home truths. I love that I felt passionately about the characters. I felt such a range of emotions throughout this story. I didn’t know how it was going to end.

This book is totally different to Colleen Hoover’s other books. It does feel like a step in another direction. I found it to be a harrowing, but important read. I was swept away with the story and for once, didn’t find it predictable.

Would I recommend it?:
Of course!

A raw, important story. Unexpected!

This Week In Books #43

I am joining in with the lovely Lipsy from Lipsy’s Lost and Found’s feature which highlights our week in books. I shall be sharing what I’m reading now, then and next! I won’t be showcasing my new books as I do that on a Saturday. I’m really excited by this feature as I loved sharing my recent reads. My book reviews published on my blog are often WAY behind what I’m actually reading, so this is a good feature to keep you up to date!

Click on the book title to get to Goodreads!

From Bad to Cursed (Bad Girls Don't Die, #2) Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things Behind the Scenes (Daylight Falls, #1)

NOWFrom Bad To CursedKatie Alender– I’m about 160 pages into this sequel to Bad Girls Don’t Die. At the moment it’s a little unsettling but nothing majorly freaky/scary has happened yet.

THEN– Furiously Happy- Jenny Lawson- I really enjoyed this book about mental health. Jenny Lawson does manage to make her stories about anxiety quite funny. You end up questioning why you’re laughing about it!

NEXT- Behind The Scenes- Dahlia Adler- I have had this book on my TBR forever, so I’m hopefully going to get to it this week!

What are you reading this week? Please feel free to leave a link to a post you do or answer in the comments below!

Ten Bookish Characters (and author!) that I’d Name A Pet After


Top Ten Tuesday is hosted by the wonderful The Broke and The Bookish. For this week’s list it’s all naming things with a literary name. It could be an animal, a child etc. etc. I decided to go for pet names and it was surprisingly fun!

Scout and Atticus – To Kill A Mockingbird

Love that book and adore the characters. They’d be cute pet names!

Manchee- The Knife of Never Letting Go

I think it’s too much to want a Manchee that talks, but I ADORE the name.

Snape, Luna, Minerva, Sirius – Harry Potter

Such awesome characters. A pet would be worthy to have those names!

Jojo- After one of my favourite authors Jojo Moyes!

A cute animal name, don’t you think?

Scarlett- Gone With The Wind

Not a massive fan of the book, but I love the name. Would be cute for a dog or a cat.

Pippi- Pippi Longstocking

I think this would be a cute name for any animal.😀 Now I want another pet to name!

What have you done for your list this week? Feel free to leave a link to your post and I’ll stop by!


Son (The Giver Quartet #4)

Son (The Giver Quartet, #4)

How did I get it?:
I bought it!

Previously reviewed by the same author:


They called her Water Claire. When she washed up on their shore, no one knew that she came from a society where emotions and colors didn’t exist. That she had become a Vessel at age thirteen. That she had carried a Product at age fourteen. That it had been stolen from her body. Claire had a son. But what became of him she never knew. What was his name? Was he even alive? She was supposed to forget him, but that was impossible. Now Claire will stop at nothing to find her child, even if it means making an unimaginable sacrifice.


Another series bites the dust! I’m thrilled I finally got around to finishing The Giver Quartet. I have really enjoyed this series and think Son is one of the strongest books in the series which is great as all too often I’ve been let down by the final book in the series. This certainly isn’t the case with Son. 

This quartet is a little bit different to other series. Each book is told by a different narrator, however throughout the quartet the characters slowly weave together. It all begins to make sense. Son is certainly one of my favourites in the series. It centres around Claire, Gabe’s mother. Claire was assigned to be a birthmother at a young age. She had to carry a product. However, the birth went wrong and Claire was reassigned. She later found out she had a son and was determined to find her child.

I think the reason I enjoyed this book so much was because it gave me all The Giver emotions but from a different point of view. I loved the beginning and the end of the story when Claire came across Gabe. I didn’t so much enjoy reading about Claire’s life outside of the Community, but that’s because I wanted to read about Gabe. I wanted her to find him so badly. It made my heart hurt a little.

I feel like Son tied lots of loose ends together which I always appreciate with a series. I’d always felt like this series was a little disjointed but this book really did bring everything together. I love seeing how some journeys ended and how some relationships came together. This quartet both broke my heart and warmed it at the same time. It’s a highly enjoyable reading experience that I highly recommend!

Would I recommend it?:
Of course!

A highly enjoyable finish to the quartet. I recommend The Giver if you’re looking for a decent dystopian read!

A Week In The Life Of A Primary School Teacher-A packed week!

Every Sunday (hopefully) I shall be posting a personal post about my life as a primary school teacher. I currently work at a primary school teaching Lower Key Stage 2. My training posts on this subject were really successful and so therapeutic for me, therefore I’ve decided to continue posting on the topic. I will not be naming any children, or the school where I work. If personal posts aren’t your thing then feel free to skip these posts. I won’t mind! Bookish goodness returns as normal Monday-Saturday!

This week was jam packed with a school trip, parents evenings and meetings. I got through it though! I have just 5 more working days until a week off. I can’t wait! I have a feeling that as soon as I stop for a week’s break that I’m going to get poorly. I’m fighting off a cold at the moment, determined that it won’t get through!

My week was really good! Behaviour seems to be a lot better and the work produced is of a much better standard too. The trip went well, if a little exhausting!

I can’t believe that I’ve had (almost) 7 weeks with this class. They are now exactly where I want them and I’m feeling positive for the future!

Strange Star

Strange Star

How did I get it?:
I received a copy from the publisher and I bought my own!

Previously reviewed by the same author:


They were coming tonight to tell ghost stories. ‘A tale to freeze the blood,’ was the only rule. Switzerland, 1816. On a stormy summer night, Lord Byron and his guests are gathered round the fire.

Felix, their serving boy, can’t wait to hear their creepy tales.

Yet real life is about to take a chilling turn – more chilling than any tale.

Frantic pounding at the front door reveals a stranger, a girl covered in the most unusual scars.

She claims to be looking for her sister, supposedly snatched from England by a woman called Mary Shelley.

Someone else has followed her here too, she says. And the girl is terrified.


I’ve made no secret of the fact that I love Emma Carroll’s books. I always find myself pulled into her stories before long and become completely immersed in the world. I thought Strange Star was a fantastic addition to her repetoire. It’s creepy but not too creepy for the middle-grade audience that it is geared towards.

Strange Star is mainly narrated by Lizzie, who appears at Villa Diodati. Felix is serving Lord Byron and his guests including Mary Shelley. Some of the narration is also told by Felix, who we hear from before and after Lizzie tells her tale. Strange Star explores the story of Lizzie’s sister, Peg, who has been taken by Mary Shelley, a scientist. I absolutely loved how Emma Carroll used Frankenstein to explain Lizzie’s story and explore the possible reasons for Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. It was incredibly clever and very compelling.

Emma Carroll is absolutely fantastic at creating characters that I really come to care about. This was especially the case with Lizzie and Peg. I loved reading about the sisters and the special bond that they had with one another. I also really liked Felix and particularly enjoyed reading his narration.

As soon as I started Strange Star,  I really didn’t want to put it down. It was a real page turner and a pleasure to read. Strange Star is unnerving without being scary which I really appreciate. I shall certainly be recommending it to the Year 5-6 team at my school (10-11 year olds) as I think they’d lap up this highly atmospheric book!

Would I recommend it?:
Of course!

A wonderful book! Emma Carroll is such a fantastic author, I highly recommend her books!