Don’t Even Think About It

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How did I get it?:
NetGalley- thanks to Hachette Children’s Books

Synopsis:

This is the story of how we became freaks. It’s how a group of I’s became a we.

When Class 10B got their flu shots, they expected some side effects. Maybe a sore arm. Maybe a headache. They definitely didn’t expect to get telepathy. But suddenly they could hear what everyone was thinking. Their friends. Their teachers. Their parents. Now they all know that Tess has a crush on her best friend, Teddy. That Mackenzie cheated on Cooper. That Nurse Carmichael used to be a stripper. Some of them will thrive. Some of them will break. None of them will ever be the same.

A smart and funny story about friendship, first love and surviving high school from the bestselling author of Ten Things We Shouldn’t Have Done.

Thoughts:

I thought Don’t Even Think About It was a quick and easy read. I have to admit that I don’t think that it’s anything remarkable, but it’s still a decent read and I’m very interested to see how the series progresses.

It explores what it would be like if we were able to know what everyone else is thinking. I used to think that would be quite cool, but I’m not so sure. Perhaps ignorance is bliss! In Don’t Even Think About It, Class 10B get to experience what that skill would be like, following a flu jab that’s had some very strange complications. The only trouble is… everyone else that has had that batch of the flu jab, can also hear what you’re thinking. Your best friend can hear your personal, intimate thoughts and so can the boy that you like.

Don’t Even Think About It uses a very different narration. It’s like all of the characters are telling their story at one point. It can be a bit hard to get used to, but once you have got your head around it, I found it quite enjoyable.

My problem with this book was that there were far too many characters for me to get involved and attached to.
I also felt like although it warns it’s not for younger readers, it felt quite immature. I think this is the way that the characters act though and not particularly the writing.

I think if you want to read some mindless fluff, then this is the book for you. I’m not criticising that it is fluffy. It’s fun, and intriguing in points. Sometimes that’s just what I need to read and I know that many people enjoy this sort of book too. I’m interested to see what happens next.

Would I recommend it?:
Yes!

8 thoughts on “Don’t Even Think About It

  1. I am currently reading it, just about to start chapter 3. I am looking forward to the bit where they can read each others thoughts. I know what you mean about the way it’s written, it sometimes a bit full on, but it’s different and works well 🙂

  2. I’m listening to Don’t Even Think About It right now. I’m liking it, but I’m not madly in love. It is odd, how all the characters are telling the story. I don’t think it’s an easy way to tell a story, and when there isn’t one main character to root for, it does affect my enjoyment personally. Although I thought Libba Bray did an excellent job of having so many characters in her book Beauty Queens. Have you read that one?

    • Yes, I can understand what you mean. It’s not the easiest way to really get to know the characters. I like it enough to continue with the series. I have read Beauty Queens and I thought Libba Bray did a brilliant job 🙂

  3. I’ve always been a fan of Sarah Mlynowski and I enjoyed this one, too. Completely agree about how I know feel about mind-reading, though. It would be a nightmare to constantly hear what others are thinking. It is a power I’d only want if I could turn it off. Great review!

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