V is for Violet

V for Violet

How did I get it?:
NetGalley- thanks to Hot Key Books

Previously reviewed by the same author:
The Quietness
The Madness
The Beloved

Synopsis:

Battersea, 1961. London is just beginning to enter the swinging sixties. The world is changing – but not for sixteen-year-old Violet. She was born at the exact moment Winston Churchill announced Victory in Europe – an auspicious start, but now she’s just stuck in her family’s fish and chip shop dreaming of greatness. And it doesn’t look like fame and fortune are going to come calling anytime soon. Then she meets Beau. Beau’s a rocker – a motorcycle boy who arrives in an explosion of passion and rebellion. He blows up Violet’s grey little life, and she can’t believe her luck. But things don’t go her way for long. Joseph, her long-lost brother, comes home. Then young girls start going missing, and turning up murdered. And then Violet’s best friend disappears too. Suddenly life is horrifyingly much more interesting. Violet can’t believe its coincidence that Joseph turns up just as girls start getting murdered. He’s weird, and she feels sure he’s hiding something. He’s got a secret, and Violet’s got a dreadful feeling it might be the worst kind of secret of all…

Thoughts:

I am unashamedly a massive fan of Alison Rattle’s writing. Seriously. I can’t get enough. I devour (and love) everything that she has come out with. When I first heard about V is for Violet, I didn’t even need to read the synopsis, if I’m totally honest. It was a no brainer. She’s an autobuy author. I just NEED to read her books and love when I get the opportunity to read them before they’re released. Fangirling aside, I shall try and put some coherent thoughts down for you.

V is for Violet is set in Battersea in the 1960s.  It’s quite a bleak time for Violet and her family. Violet’s family lost their first born son when he went missing during the war. Violet has just left school and instead of following her friend, Jackie into a career at a sugar factory, Violet is made to work in the family fish and chip shop. Not the most exciting job. Violet feels like she’s losing Jackie. Jackie is growing up and doing things that she always promised she’d do with Violet. Jackie’s becoming really popular and Violet believes she’s lagging behind. Then girls of around Violet’s age begin to go missing and then their bodies turn up. There’s a murderer out on the loose and when Violet’s brother, Joseph, returns to the family home, Violet begins to suspect something.

As always with Alison Rattle books I absolutely adored the characters. Violet is such a brilliant protagonist. I imeediately liked her, warmed to her and wanted the best for her. I felt for her as she tried to create an identity that was much more than the dutiful daughter who would work in the family business. She didn’t want to be like her sister Norma. Norma seemed too old for her age and was married to an incredibly boring man. I adored the introduction of Beau who was a complete contrast to Violet. He was a biker bad boy and so different to Violet. He really spiced up her seemingly dull life. There are elements of mystery within this book which I absolutely adored. It was never clear cut who the murderer was, which I really appreciated. Twists and turns aplenty. I like!

Again, with Alison Rattle’s writing, you can guarantee that there will be great atmosphere and build up. I seriously don’t know how she does it. She’s a genius, but I always feel like I’m IN the book watching the story unfold. Her books may be marketed at Young Adult, but I truly believe you can enjoy Alison’s writing no matter what age you are. She has a way with words and really should be read more!

Would I recommend it?:
Without a doubt!

Another gem from one of my favourite writers. READ IT!

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4 thoughts on “V is for Violet

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