Blog Tour- I’m A Dragon You See (Children’s Book Review)

I'm A Dragon You See

How did I get it?:
Sent to me for the blog tour, this did not affect my opinion of the book!

Synopsis:

Have you ever wondered what a Dragon likes to do for fun? Or what he might look like? Even what he likes to eat. Is it ice cream or pasta? Then ‘I am a Dragon you see’ will reveal all these mysteries and more. Go on an adventure with a fun repeating rhyme and colourful illustrations. A fun way of learning about the importance of friendship and kindness.

Thoughts:

I was approached to read this book for the blog tour, so I thought I’d give it a go. It’s a short picture book with some lovely illustrations to go alongside the story.

It’s a very sweet story about what a dragon likes to do for fun, what he might eat and many more different things. I think it’s a really charming story. From a teaching point of view, it would be lovely to use to teach rhyme. There’s certainly plenty of rhymes to pick out. There’s also repetitive language which I know children would quickly pick up and love to repeat.

I think this book would be perfect for 4-7 year olds, especially for the younger range because they’ll lap up the story and enjoy the rhyme and repetition!

Would I recommend it?:
Yes!

A cute read, it doesn’t have as much depth for me to use as a class read, but it is still super sweet and will be going into my book corner for my class to enjoy!

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Beth and Chrissi Do Kid-Lit- The Wide Window (A Series Of Unfortunate Events #3)

The Wide Window (A Series of Unfortunate Events, #3)

How did I get it?:
I bought it!

Previously reviewed by the same author:
The Bad Beginning
The Reptile Room

Synopsis:

Dear Reader,

If you have not read anything about the Baudelaire orphans, then before you read even one more sentence, you should know this: Violet, Klaus, and Sunny are kindhearted and quick-witted; but their lives, I am sorry to say, are filled with bad luck and misery. All of the stories about these three children are unhappy and wretched, and this one may be the worst of them all. If you haven’t got the stomach for a story that includes a hurricane, a signalling device, hungry leeches, cold cucumber soup, a horrible villain, and a doll named Pretty Penny, then this book will probably fill you with despair. I will continue to record these tragic tales, for that is what I do. You, however, should decide for yourself whether you can possibly endure this miserable story.

With all due respect,

Lemony Snicket

Thoughts:

We have been visiting A Series of Unfortunate Events as part of our kid-lit challenge for the past 2 years. It was a given that the third book would be on the list for this year. I really enjoyed this one. Beth and I didn’t read these books growing up and I’m sad that we didn’t. I totally think we would’ve loved them. I know my nephew enjoys the Netflix show and I’m somewhat intrigued to watch it… but I always feel I should read the books first. I know, I know… I’m weird.

I loved following the Baudelaire siblings tale in this latest instalment. It’s as dark and as sinister as the other two books. Violet, Klaus and Sunny are taken to live with another relative that they hadn’t met before. They come across the terrible Count Olaf once more…in disguise. It is a completely strange story which I’m absolutely captivated by. It’s so over the top but so wonderful at the same time.

The adult characters in this book seem to make awful decisions but I think that’s almost the beauty of the book? It shows children that adults don’t always make the right choices. They can be scared and unsure too.

In the previous two books, the constant defining of words within the narration bugged me, but it wasn’t really in this book. However the meaning of what Sunny babbled was suggested by the author. This didn’t grate on me as much as the defining did, but reading from an adult’s eyes, it does come across as a little repetitive. This is my only complaint really about the story, which otherwise I think is a delightful reading experience!

For Beth’s wonderful review, please check out her blog, HERE.

Would I recommend it?:
Of course!

Next up in the Beth and Chrissi Do Kid-Lit Challenge (June):
The Face On The Milk Carton- Caroline B.Cooney

Chrissi’s Class Reads #8

We’ve read another 5 books, so I thought I’d share them with you today!

Remember, clicking on the book image will take you to the Goodreads page for the book!

Danny McGee Drinks the Sea

I wasn’t sure about this book before I read it. It looked like it wasn’t going to capture their attention as there’s not much to it, but I was wrong. My class absolutely loved it and voted for it as one of their favourites as a year. It just shows that they don’t always need an in-depth story to enjoy! Sometimes ridiculous works just as well!

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As a teacher, I love when children make connections between stories they know. This is what happened with this story! It makes my bookworm heart happy.

The Bad Bunnies' Magic Show

I thought this one would be the favourite of my class! They like anything that mentions bad or naughty characters. They did enjoy it, but Danny McGee stole their hearts.

Wilf the Mighty Worrier: Battles a Pirate

Last year, my class read two books in the Wilf series with their last teacher. They requested that we read another in the series, and of course I had to fulfil that request. I don’t think this book is for everyone as not all of my class were engaged by it. However, the majority of them did enjoy the story, laughed out loud and joined in with some repeated language!

Cheesemares

My class really enjoyed this book which didn’t take us long to read at all. It made them laugh out loud at many moments. I liked that it was a short, snappy read after it taking us a while to get through Wilf. They often asked me to read this book, unlike Wilf! 

Beth and Chrissi Do Kit Lit- Ratburger

Ratburger

How did I get it?:
I bought it!

Previously reviewed by the same author:

Synopsis:

“Meet Zoe. She’s got a lot of things to be unhappy about:
* Her stepmother Sheila is so lazy she asks Zoe to pick her nose for her.
* The school bully Tina Trotts makes her life a misery – mainly by flobbing on her head.
* And on top of it all, the dastardly Burt has terrible plans for her pet rat.

I can’t tell you what those plans are, but there’s a clue in the title of this book…”

Thoughts:

I really enjoy David Walliams’ writing, so I try to ensure we have one on our reading list for the kid-lit challenge. Being a primary school teacher, I love reading current children’s literature to find perfect, modern stories for them. As much as they love Roald Dahl, they adore David Walliams too. He really is the closest thing to Roald Dahl than the man himself.

Ratburger tells the story of a girl called Zoe. She’s having a tough time at school. She comes from a poor background, she’s small and an instant target for bullies. Zoe lives with her father and her awful stepmother, Sheila. Zoe’s dad has lost his job and spends most of the time in the pub. Zoe is left at home, with the lazy stepmother, living in a leaning tower block of flats. Zoe’s hamster has just died. She was convinced that she was going to find fame with her hamster as she had spent some time training it. When Zoe comes across a baby rat, she knows she won’t have to give up on her dreams. However, Zoe has to keep Armitage (the rat) away from her terrible stepmother and Burt an evil burger van driver which gives the story a much darker twist.

I felt like Ratburger had some amazing characters in the story. Zoe was wonderful and a fantastic character to follow. Burt and Sheila are so awful that it’s fun to read about them. I always love Raj, the newsagent, who appears in so many of David’s books. I also loved the school teacher, Miss Midge. I love how David Walliams wrote her character. God knows I love a terrible teacher in a story!

I love David Walliams’ books because there are moments that really make you smile or laugh out loud. I also love how there’s something in there for the adults that are reading the book to a child. I’ve noticed with David’s books that some comments can be a bit risque but only if you know the meaning behind it. It goes over most children’s heads.

The reason why I love David Walliams’ books is that they can encourage the most reluctant of readers. They’re genuinely a joy to read out to children. I could easily see myself reading this to a class and it is a definite contender for a class book come September. David’s books also give me inspiration for teaching. There’s so much that can be done with this book if you’re reading it as a class read! 🙂 It made this teacher very happy.

For Beth’s wonderful review, please check out her blog HERE.

Would I recommend it?:
Of course!

Next up in the Beth and Chrissi do Kid-Lit Challenge (May):
The Wide Window (A Series Of Unfortunate Events #3)-Lemony Snicket

Sky Chasers

Sky Chasers

How did I get it?
I bought it!

Previously reviewed by the same author:

Synopsis:

An encounter with a boy dangling from the sky changes pickpocket Magpie’s life forever. His family, the Montgolfiers, are desperate to discover the secret of flight. Together with Pierre, Magpie is caught up in a world of inflatable bloomers, spies and unruly animals in a race to be the first to fly a hot air balloon – in front of the King and Queen of France.

Thoughts:

You might look at my previously read by the same author section and infer that I’m quite the fan of Emma Carroll. You’d be right. She’s one of my favourite authors. I always know that I’m in for a decent read when I pick up a book of Emma’s. I really enjoyed reading Sky Chasers and yet it again, it has me yearning to be in Key Stage 2 once more so I can teach it/read it to my class! They’re a little young this year for this book but it didn’t stop me thinking of the ways that this book could be used educatively.

This book comes from an idea by Neal Jackson who was the winner of Chicken House’s The Big Idea Competition. What an idea it was! Sky Chasers is a story that centres around the Montgolfier family. They are part of the race to discover the secret of flight. Alongside pickpocket Magpie, they begin to create a hot air balloon. They need to take it to King Louis XVI.  However, their mission is not easy and they have many obstacles in the way like spies and misbehaving animals.

This story is so much fun and I imagine children would be completely captivated by the tale. I know I was! Emma Carroll’s writing style is simply wonderful and always catapults the reader right into the action. I’ve mentioned before that it feels like you’re inside the story watching the action unfold.

Magpie is a wonderful female character. We’re always looking for strong female leads to inspire our girls at school because quite often it’s a strong male lead. Magpie had gone through so much. She experiences the loss of both parents and has to learn to live and survive on her own. There are some other brilliant characters who are so well developed. I immediately enjoy reading about characters in an Emma Carroll book because they’re well written and incredibly three dimensional.

It didn’t take me long to read this beautiful book! I definitely see myself using it if I ever get back to Key Stage 2. Until then I’ll highly recommend it to my junior colleagues.

Would I recommend it?:
Of course!

A wonderful read! Highly recommended!

Chrissi’s Class Reads #7

I’ve read 5 more books with my class and thought I’d share them with you today. At the moment I teach 6-7 year olds. We’re currently making our way through a book for pleasure (these books have had either a writing or reading purpose) but I’ll mention it when we finish! 🙂

Last Stop On Market Street- Matt De La Pena

Last Stop on Market Street

This is such a sweet story. It’s about a young boy who doesn’t appreciate what he has until he is shown how privileged he really is. I used it to get the children to think about how lucky they were and to compare the main character’s area to their own!

The Utterly Otterleys- Mairi Hedderwick

The Utterly Otterleys

A cute story all about otters who try to find a new home but realise there wasn’t anything wrong with theirs in the first place. It’s adorable. Again, it’s about being grateful for what you have.

The Princess and The Pea- Hans Christian Andersen

The Princess and the Pea

I was inspired to use this book recently when I attended a course. It’s a well known fairy tale (I love fairy tales… see Fairy Tale Friday…) and I think it’s so important that children still read or are read these classics.

The Pea And The Princess- Mini Grey

The Pea And The Princess

I read the children this book before they created their own story of The Pea and The Princess. You won’t believe the quality writing I got out of this task!

Tidy- Emily Gravett

Tidy

This has been our latest read. It was ever so sweet. It’s about Pete the badger, who wants to keep the forest tidy. He ends up covering it in concrete but soon realises that was a very bad idea…

Beth and Chrissi Do Kid-Lit- The Girl of Ink and Stars

The Girl of Ink and Stars

How did I get it?:
I bought it!

Synopsis:

Forbidden to leave her island, Isabella Riosse dreams of the faraway lands her father once mapped.

When her closest friend disappears into the island’s Forgotten Territories, she volunteers to guide the search. As a cartographer’s daughter, she’s equipped with elaborate ink maps and knowledge of the stars, and is eager to navigate the island’s forgotten heart.

But the world beyond the walls is a monster-filled wasteland – and beneath the dry rivers and smoking mountains, a legendary fire demon is stirring from its sleep. Soon, following her map, her heart and an ancient myth, Isabella discovers the true end of her journey: to save the island itself.

Thoughts:

I was really excited when this book was picked as part of our kid-lit challenge. It has been on my radar for quite some time now and this challenge gave me an opportunity to get around to it. For me, this is a solid middle grade read. I started off really loving it, but my enthusiasm waned after a while.

It centres around Isabella who is a cartographer’s daughter. Isabella dreams of lands that her father once mapped. It takes her close friend disappearing for her to begin to explore the world outside of her island. Isabella wants to guide the search. She has knowledge of ink maps and wants to help find her dear friend. The world beyond the island isn’t what she expected at all. Isabella soon encounters things that she thought were just myths are really true.

I loved reading about Isabella’s adventures. I enjoyed the old stories involved within this story. I felt like this made the story very unique. However, I found it really hard to connect to Isabella as a character. There wasn’t anything wrong with her, a perfectly nice character, I just didn’t find myself rooting for her. I actually preferred Lupe, who I found to be incredibly quirky.

I did enjoy how this book was centred around friendship and family. I love books that have friendship at the heart of it. I found Isabella and Lupe’s friendship to be genuine. It was up and down which is totally relatable. As I’ve mentioned before on my blog, I really like books that have strong female characters, especially in middle grade. I think a lot of the time books have male characters as the heroes and we need a better balance!

I thought Kiran Millwood Hargrave’s writing was easy to read and imaginative. I can certainly see why it won the Waterstone’s Children’s Book Awards. There’s so much for children to get stuck into and enjoy.

For Beth’s wonderful review, check out her blog HERE.

Would I recommend it?:
Yes! 3.5 stars

Next up in the Beth and Chrissi do Kid-Lit Challenge (End of April):
Ratburger- David Walliams