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How did I get it?:
I bought it.

Synopsis:

‘My life begins at the Y…’ Abandoned as a newborn at the doors of the local YMCA and then bounced between foster homes, Shannon eventually finds stability in the home of Miranda, a single mother with a daughter of her own. But as Shannon grows, so do her questions. Will she ever belong? Who is her true family? And why would her parents abandon Shannon on the day she was born?

The answers lie in the heartrending tale of her mother, a headstrong young woman trapped in a series of events that will change her life forever.

Thoughts:

This book is the first of 11 debut novels from authors that Waterstones have selected to showcase writers with great promise. I was really excited to read this book from the synopsis, but I have to admit to being somewhat disappointed by it. This is a difficult review to write because I really did want to enjoy it and there’s no denying that Majorie Celona is a talented writer.

The writing was good and easy to read and the characters were strong and interesting. Majorie Celona’s descriptions are wonderful. It’s a very original plot which is why I think it excited me to begin with. I think my problem with this book was the narrative. It’s told by Shannon, the girl who was abandoned, but in-between the reader learns (through third person depictions) about Shannon’s real parents lives up to the abandonment. I think this is what made it feel jarred to me. I preferred to read it from the present day and Shannon’s point of view as the split in narrative just didn’t seem to fit together seamlessly.

It’s not an easy story to read because it is incredibly bleak. Nothing seems to go right for Shannon, and even when something slightly positive happens, then something else bad seems to come along. I did enjoy the story nearer the end which I won’t spoil for those that haven’t read it, but to me, this part was the most touching.

Would I recommend it?:
Yes!

Reading next:
Rebecca- Daphne Du Maurier