Top Ten Books From The Psychological Thriller Genre

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January 2018. It’s all about love of lists, love of literature and bringing bookish people together. 

This week’s list is all about picking favourite books from our favourite genre. I used to only read what could be described as chick-lit. Now, I read more widely, but I am very partial to a psychological thriller. Here are some of my favourites, in no particular order!

Book images go to Goodreads

The Silent Patient

The Silent Patient

One of my recent favourites. Read it! Read it!

Cuckoo

Cuckoo

I read this thriller years ago but I absolutely adored it. It was so warped. I’m not sure what that says about me.

Gone Girl

Gone Girl

If you want to meet some messed up characters, read Gone Girl. 

Before I Go To Sleep

Before I Go to Sleep

I remember being utterly gripped by this book!

Good Me, Bad Me

 

IGood Me, Bad Me

I absolutely adored this book and it earned its place on my favourite’s shelf. I don’t put books there often.

Dangerous Girls

Dangerous Girls

This book was another incredible, fast paced read. I highly recommend it.

I Let You Go

I Let You Go

Ooh, this is another cracking read! Worth giving a go!

The Foster Child

The Foster Child

This is another recent (ish) read of mine. I really enjoyed it. Creepy but SO good.

The Daughter

The Daughter

I was really impressed with this book! The story had me gripped from the beginning.

The Liar’s Room

The Liar's Room

I really enjoyed this book. Simon Lelic is a great author and I always love how his books build.

What did you do for your list this week? Let me know! Feel free to leave a link to your post and I’ll stop by.

Round Up of British Books Challenge 2017

The British Books Challenge is hosted by Michelle at Tales of Yesterday. Find out more about it HERE.

The British Book Challenge was set up to show support for British Authors. By signing up I promised to read at least 12 books by British Authors. I smashed it once again this year by reading 63 books by British Authors.

Here are 2017’s efforts!

  1. The One Memory of Flora Banks– Emily Barr
  2. Paper Butterflies– Lisa Heathfield
  3. We Come Apart– Sarah Crossan and Brian Conaghan
  4. How Hard Can Love Be?– Holly Bourne
  5. Disclaimer– Renee Knight
  6. Margot & Me– Juno Dawson
  7. The Trouble With Goats and Sheep– Joanna Cannon
  8. The Witchfinder’s Sister– Beth Underdown
  9. London Belongs To Us– Sarra Manning
  10. The Cuckoo Sister– Vivian Alcock
  11. The Curious Incident of The Dog In The Night-Time– Mark Haddon
  12. The One– John Marrs
  13. Mad Girl– Bryony Gordon
  14. Lie With Me– Sabine Durrant
  15. Pilot Jane and The Runaway Plane– Caroline Baxter
  16. Fish Boy- Chloe Daykin
  17. Awful Auntie– David Walliams
  18. The Last Beginning- Lauren James
  19. Girlhood– Cat Clarke
  20. One Italian Summer- Keris Stainton
  21. Release- Patrick Ness
  22. Unboxed- Non Pratt
  23. Follow Me– Angela Clarke
  24. Watch Me– Angela Clarke
  25. Trust Me– Angela Clarke
  26. Truth Or Dare– Non Pratt
  27. I See You- Clare Mackintosh
  28. Blood Sisters– Jane Corry
  29. The Prime Minister’s Brain- Gillian Cross
  30. The Nearest Faraway Place– Hayley Long
  31. The Graces– Laure Eve
  32. Miss You– Kate Eberlen
  33. Damage– Eve Ainsworth
  34. Indigo Donut– Patrice Lawrence
  35. Gone Without A Trace– Mary Torjussen
  36. Her Husband’s Lover– Julia Crouch
  37. He Said/She Said– Erin Kelly
  38. Cartes Postales from Greece– Victoria Hislop
  39. Fortunately, The Milk– Neil Gaiman
  40. Good Me, Bad Me– Ali Land
  41. The Scarecrow Queen– Melinda Salisbury
  42. Charlotte Says– Alex Bell
  43. Close To Me– Amanda Reynolds
  44. Coraline- Neil Gaiman
  45. The House– Simon Lelic
  46. The Betrayals- Fiona Neill
  47. The Trophy Child– Paula Daly
  48. Saffy’s Angel– Hilary McKay
  49. Behind Closed Doors- B.A Paris
  50. No Virgin– Anne Cassidy
  51. No Shame– Anne Cassidy
  52. Then She Was Gone– Lisa Jewell
  53. The Treatment– C.L Taylor
  54. Letters From The Lighthouse– Emma Carroll
  55. Black Hearts In Battersea– Joan Aiken
  56. The Polar Bear Explorers’ Club- Alex Bell
  57. 13 Minutes– Sarah Pinborough
  58. The Hours Before Dawn– Celia Fremlin
  59. Noah Can’t Even– Simon James Green
  60. Witch Child- Celia Rees
  61. The Friend– Dorothy Koomson
  62. A Quiet Kind Of Thunder– Sara Barnard
  63. Finding Jennifer Jones– Anne Cassidy

Top Ten Favourite Books of 2017

Top Ten Tuesday is hosted by the wonderful The Broke and The Bookish. This week’s list are the Top Ten Book of 2017.  This should be a fun one! I’m looking forward to reading other people’s lists so I can see what they’ve come up with.

As ever, click on the book image to get to the Goodreads page for the book.

Indigo Donut- Patrice Lawrence

Indigo Donut

I absolutely love Patrice Lawrence’s writing. She’s so underrated.

Letters From The Lighthouse- Emma Carroll

Letters from the Lighthouse

Emma Carroll’s writing is simply beautiful to read. This book takes place in World War II. It’s an amazing piece of children’s literature.

Her Husband’s Lover- Julia Crouch

Her Husband's Lover

I love a thriller and Julia Crouch writes them well.

Good Me, Bad Me- Ali Land

Good Me, Bad Me

This book is so deeply disturbing.

History Is All You Left Me- Adam Silvera

History Is All You Left Me

I didn’t expect to like this book as much as I did, but I thought it was incredible.

George- Alex Gino

George

A touching, important read.

We Come Apart- Sarah Crossan and Brian Conaghan

We Come Apart

I have really enjoyed Sarah’s writing in the past and thought this was a fabulous read.

Letters To The Lost- Brigid Kemmerer

Letters to the Lost

This book touched me! I loved reading it.

Awful Auntie- David Walliams

Awful Auntie

David Walliams is a fantastic writer for children. There’s always something there for adults reading too which is very clever.

My Lady Jane- Cynthia Hand, Jodi Meadows and Brodi Ashton

My Lady Jane: The Not Entirely True Story

This book was just ridiculous and I loved that.

What have you put on your list this week? Let me know! Feel free to leave a link to your post and I’ll stop by! Happy Reading 🙂

Book Tag- Shelfie by Shelfie #1

I was tagged in Beth’s Shelfie by Shelfie book tag. I thought it was a great idea… so here we go!

The idea of the tag is that you share a picture (‘shelfie’) of one of your shelves and then answer some questions about them.

1.) Is there any reason for this shelf being organised the way it is or is it purely random?

It’s my favourite shelf. Meaning every single one of these books is a favourite read of mine. On it is….

  • The Curious Incident of The Dog In The Night-Time
  • The Constant Princess
  • The Other Boleyn Girl
  • The Boleyn Inheritance
  • The Virgin’s Lover
  • The Queen’s Fool
  • Sarah’s Key
  • If You Could See Me Now
  • P.S. I Love You
  • Lord Of The Flies
  • Rebecca
  • To Kill A Mockingbird
  • The Last Leaves Falling
  • Cross Your Heart
  • Me Before You
  • The Boy In The Striped Pyjamas
  • The Class That Went Wild
  • Reasons To Stay Alive
  • One
  • Thirteen Reasons Why
  • A Monster Calls
  • Only Ever Yours
  • Simon Vs The Homo Sapiens Agenda
  • Good Me Bad Me
  • The Reason I Jump

2.) Tell us a story about one of the books on this shelf that is special to you i.e. how you got it/ a memory associated with it etc.

That’s a tricky one as all of these books are special to me. The Class That Went Wild has a special place in my heart as it is a childhood favourite. I have fond memories of Beth reading it to me when I was younger. I used to love being read to by my big sister!

3.) Which book from this shelf would you ditch if you were forced to and why?

I think perhaps Thirteen Reasons Why. I have a really weird relationship with this book, which I’ll address in a blog post and some point.

4.) Which book from this shelf would you save in an emergency and why?

I hate this question! I would want to save them all, please? No? Hmm… I think it would have to be Me Before You. I push that book so very much that it has to be saved!

5.) Which book has been on this shelf for the longest time?

P.S. I Love You. I read it when it first came out!

6.) Which book is the newest addition to this shelf?

Good Me, Bad Me read this year and promptly added to my favourites!

7.) Which book from this shelf are you most excited to read (or re-read if this is a favourites shelf?)

Me Before You… will it still be a favourite after a re-read?

8.) If there is an object on this shelf apart from books, tell us the story behind it.

Above the shelf are some ornaments that my friend (and wonderful author Alex Bell) got me from a holiday to many different locations. There’s so many cute trinkets from places in Europe. I also have a teaching assistant teddy from a child that reminds me of when life was easier as teaching assistant! 😉 I also have some Tinkerbell stuff from my nephew who knows I love Tinkerbell, I also have a best teacher wine glass. I may not drink, but it was the thought that counts!

9.) What does this shelf tell us about you as a reader?

My favourite books range from chick-lit and historical fiction to psychological thrillers and a few classics!

10.) Choose other bloggers to tag or choose a free question you make up yourself.

There’s so many that I’d like to tag, so I’d just say if you want to do it, please do and leave me a link if you do! 🙂 Please check out Beth’s original post HERE!

Talking About ‘Good Me, Bad Me’ with Bibliobeth!

Good Me, Bad Me

How did I get it?:
I bought it!

Synopsis:

Milly’s mother is a serial killer. Though Milly loves her mother, the only way to make her stop is to turn her in to the police. Milly is given a fresh start: a new identity, a home with an affluent foster family, and a spot at an exclusive private school.

But Milly has secrets, and life at her new home becomes complicated. As her mother’s trial looms, with Milly as the star witness, Milly starts to wonder how much of her is nature, how much of her is nurture, and whether she is doomed to turn out like her mother after all.

When tensions rise and Milly feels trapped by her shiny new life, she has to decide: Will she be good? Or is she bad? She is, after all, her mother’s daughter.

CHRISSI: I started this book a bit before you and told you how disturbing it was. Did you agree with my initial impression? What were your first impressions?

BETH: It was quite funny in a way. You started reading it and then texted me just two words – “Woah dude.” Then I got to the exact same point in the book that you did and texted you exactly the same thing! I know we usually hate comparisons and like that a book should stand on its own but as you said to me, this was one of the most disturbing things I’ve read since Gone Girl, I think. Obviously I don’t want to go into too many details for fear of spoilers but this novel is a lot darker, a lot twistier and more warped than I could have ever expected. You would think I might be expecting this if you read the synopsis? No, I wasn’t prepared for how “wrong,” it was going to get.

BETH: What did you think of the character of Phoebe? Could you sympathise with her at all?

CHRISSI: It’s an interesting question as Phoebe is such a complex character. I felt sorry for her because her home life was pretty horrific. Her mother didn’t have a great bond with her and she was feeling left out when Milly was getting a lot of attention from Phoebe’s parents. That can’t be nice. Especially when Phoebe’s mum gave Milly a gift that Phoebe thought was a precious thing between Phoebe and her mother. However, I didn’t feel comfortable with the bullying that Phoebe and her friends were inflicting upon Milly. Bullying should never be excused in my eyes!

CHRISSI: Ali Land is a Child and Adolescent Mental Health nurse – how do you think this affects the way she has written this novel?

BETH: I think it’s given her a perfect insight into mental illness in children, to be honest. She’s probably seen and experienced some things in her career and understands how a child may view a certain situation, what they might do and what kinds of emotions they might be experiencing as a result. Because of this, the novel came across as very authentic to me and as I mentioned before, I certainly wasn’t prepared for the directions the author took with the story.

BETH: Milly has to give evidence in a court in front of her mother – how do you think this was handled in the novel?

CHRISSI: I thought this was dealt with really well in the novel. Milly wanted to be there in court and this wasn’t disregarded because it was too tough for her. The adults around Milly seemed to listen to her. I also enjoyed how the court scenes were written. I loved how Milly’s mother’s presence was so strong in the novel. It was almost creepy. She felt like an incredibly evil character (what she did was awful!) and her little movements mentioned in the court scene made my skin crawl. I loved how the author made us feel her presence in court (despite Milly not physically seeing her) and how much Milly was aware of it.

CHRISSI: What does this story tell us about the question of nature vs nurture?

BETH: As a scientist (by day!) I probably could have a very scientific answer for you… 😝 but to be honest, I think the book explores both aspects. Is it the genes within us that programme us to be what we are and how we react to certain situations? Or is it the environment outside i.e. how we are brought up, who we interact with that determines our behaviour and actions. If I’m fair, poor Milly didn’t have much of a choice either way considering she was brought up with a serial killer for a mother. It’s how she responds when taken out of that situation however that gets very interesting.

BETH: How would you describe the relationship between Milly and her mother?

CHRISSI: In two words… incredibly unhealthy! I felt like Milly constantly struggled with the feelings towards her mother. It says it all really in the title ‘Good Me, Bad Me.’ Milly was so aware of what was right and wrong. She knew what her mother had done was wrong, yet she still felt a strong pull towards her, despite all of the awful things that had happened to her. Milly really was messed up by her mother and understandably so. Their relationship was toxic. Milly’s mother ‘training’ her daughter for such awful things…

CHRISSI: How does this book compare to others in its heavily populated genre?

BETH: I was a huge fan of this book. I think it stands heads and shoulders above quite a few books in the genre. I don’t know if it’s the writing style, the subject matter or the fact that the author isn’t afraid to go to incredibly dark places but I loved what she did with the story and even though it made me feel intensely uncomfortable and disgusted it was an unforgettable reading experience.

BETH: Would you read another novel by this author?

CHRISSI: I really would! This is such a promising debut novel. I loved how Ali Land didn’t shy away from such an uncomfortable topic.

Would we recommend it?:

BETH: Without a doubt!

CHRISSI: Without a doubt!

 

This Week In Books #75

I am joining in with the lovely Lipsy from Lipsy’s Lost and Found’s feature which highlights our week in books. I shall be sharing what I’m reading now, then and next! I won’t be showcasing my new books as I do that on a Saturday. I’m really excited by this feature as I loved sharing my recent reads. My book reviews published on my blog are often WAY behind what I’m actually reading, so this is a good feature to keep you up to date!

Thirteen Reasons Why Coraline (Illustrated/Graphic Novel Edition) Good Me, Bad Me

NOW– Thirteen Reasons Why- Jay Asher- I’m currently reading this book (well re-reading, I read it a few years back!) for the Banned Books feature that I do with my sister, Beth. Our feature will be out on Monday! I’m looking forward to getting stuck into this book and seeing if I feel differently about it now.

THEN– Coraline- Neil Gaiman– I’d never read Coraline before picking up this graphic novel. I thoroughly enjoyed reading it. I was quite surprised at how creepy it was. I wasn’t expecting that as I know this book is quite often taught in primary schools!

NEXT– Good Me Bad Me- Ali Land- I’m intrigued by this psychological thriller. Beth and I will be discussing it together within the next week or so!

What are you reading this week? Feel free to let me know in the comments or leave a link to your post!