Daisy Jones & The Six *Buddy review with Bibliobeth*

Daisy Jones and The Six

How did I get it?:

I bought it!

Synopsis:

For a while, Daisy Jones & The Six were everywhere. Their albums were on every turntable, they sold out arenas from coast to coast, their sound defined an era. And then, on 12 July 1979, they split. Nobody ever knew why. Until now. They were lovers and friends and brothers and rivals. They couldn’t believe their luck, until it ran out. This is their story of the early days and the wild nights, but everyone remembers the truth differently. The only thing they all know for sure is that from the moment Daisy Jones walked barefoot onstage at the Whisky, their lives were irrevocably changed. Making music is never just about the music. And sometimes it can be hard to tell where the sound stops and the feelings begin.

Thoughts:

When I recently got a copy of Daisy Jones & The Six Beth suggested that we buddy read it. We usually don’t buddy read, but I thought I’d go for it this time, especially as it was during my 2 week break. I had time to commit to reading which is just fabulous. I enjoyed my buddy reading experience. Whilst I don’t think I could read our books like this all the time (hoorah for Talking About, Kid-Lit and Banned Books- our other features!) buddy reading will be happening again.

We wanted something different to differentiate this review from the others that we do. Beth came up with the idea to describe the book using the first letters of Daisy Jones… I thought that sounded fun and unique, so here it is!

Drug dabbling- (look at that alliteration!)- This book is based in an era where drugs and rock ‘n’ roll were definitely a think. Be prepared to read about a lot of drug use.

Absorbing- the way in which the story is told completely pulls you in. It’s very unique.

Immortal- I feel like Daisy felt she was immortal. The music of the band will always keep them alive, but I always felt like she was dabbling with her mortality with every drug binge.

Savage- Without spoilers, I felt like some of the characters’ actions were savage although sometimes necessary… Ooh intriguing!

Young- I felt for Daisy all through the book. I think the lack of love she had from a young age contributed to her troubles.

Jealous- Initially, I thought there might be a lot of jealousy in the story. I think there’s elements of jealousy, but I was surprised at how accommodating some of the characters were… No spoilers 😉 Sorry!

Obvious- Beth and I were texting at various stop points and although we partly guessed what might happen, we didn’t fully get it right. I like that the story isn’t that obvious. I think because there was such a twist on Evelyn Hugo we expected the unexpected?

Notable- This book felt like it was real. It did feel like this band existed and were reading an expose.

Effortless- Taylor Jenkins Reid’s writing seems effortless, (even though I’m sure she puts lots of effort into writing beautifully!) it’s just so seamless and easy to devour.

Satisfying- I’ve ended both Evelyn Hugo and Daisy Jones & The Six feeling very satisfied. I’m now sure I want to read more from this author!

Please go and check Beth’s take on this book by visiting her blog, HERE.

Would I recommend it?:

Without a doubt!

I Am The Messenger *Buddy read with Stefani from I Read Books*

I Am the Messenger

How did I get it?:
I bought it from Mr B’s Emporium

Synopsis:

protect the diamonds
survive the clubs
dig deep through the spades
feel the hearts

Ed Kennedy is an underage cabdriver without much of a future. He’s pathetic at playing cards, hopelessly in love with his best friend, Audrey, and utterly devoted to his coffee-drinking dog, the Doorman. His life is one of peaceful routine and incompetence until he inadvertently stops a bank robbery.

That’s when the first ace arrives in the mail.

That’s when Ed becomes the messenger.

Chosen to care, he makes his way through town helping and hurting (when necessary) until only one question remains: Who’s behind Ed’s mission?

Thoughts:

I have had a copy of I Am The Messenger for such a long time now, I was just waiting for the right time to slot it in, but like always, some other books had caught my attention. When Stefani from I Read Books contacted me asking whether I’d want to buddy read this book, I jumped at the chance! An opportunity to read it! Yay!

Now, neither of us have taken part in a buddy read before, so we didn’t really know what we were doing. I thought it was fun though, reading a book at the same time as a blogging friend! We tweeted a few times both highlighting what a strange and intriguing read this book is. I was immediately pulled into Markus Zusak’s writing. I couldn’t put it down.

I Am The Messenger centres around Ed, who isn’t doing much with his life. When he is faced with a bank robbery and comes out of it a hero, strange events start happening to him. Ed receives messages in the mail. They are messages which tell him to help (or in some cases hurt!) others. I Am The Messenger is an intriguing story, its plot is fast paced and has quite some intensity!

At first, I thought this book was going to be an action packed read. The first chapter is incredibly fast paced and suspenseful, but then the action slows right down. I’m not sure that everyone would get on with this book. It’s well written, but much like The Book Thief, I Am The Messenger is a book that I think will divide readers purely down to its uniqueness.

If I’m totally honest, I didn’t really connect with the characters as much as I wanted to. They were well written characters, Ed in particular grows so much throughout the book. It’s lovely to read about him growing in confidence as the story progresses. It’s just for some reason, I never really had a strong connection with any of the characters.

This book has good heart. The message I took from it was a message about humanity. We could all do things to help others at some point in our lives.

For Stefani’s review, please check out her blog HERE

Would I recommend it?:
Of course!

I Am The Messenger is unique. The message behind it is heartwarming.