Bookish Bingo Wrap Up

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I participated in Bookish Bingo  which was hosted by the lovely ladies over at Great Imaginations. I managed to read a book for EACH of the squares. I’m very proud of the reading I managed in the months of April, May and June. I’m totally getting involved in the summer edition of Bookish Bingo. I found it was a great way to get some of those pesky books off my TBR shelf, and I discovered some new books along the way.

Here are my reviews:

  1. Chains

  2. Flyaway

  3. The Wrong Boy

  4. Shadow and Bone

  5. Wedding Night

  6. A Million Little Pieces

  7. Dandelion Clocks

  8. Fruit Of The Lemon

  9. The Anti-Prom

  10. Breadcrumbs

  11. The Great Gatsby

  12. Birthmarked

  13. Dear Killer

  14. The Fat Girl

  15. Wanderlove

  16. Side Effects May Vary

  17. Where’d you go Bernadette?

  18. Smart Girls Get What They Want

  19. By Any Other Name

  20. Die For Me

  21. Tape

  22. Golden

  23. Just Like Fate

  24. Warm Bodies

Here is the board for the next Bookish Bingo game. Will you be playing along?

Click on the bingo board to get to Great Imaginations blog!

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The Great Gatsby

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How did I get it?:
I downloaded it free for my Kindle.

Synopsis:

In 1922, F. Scott Fitzgerald announced his decision to write “something new–something extraordinary and beautiful and simple and intricately patterned.” That extraordinary, beautiful, intricately patterned, and above all, simple novel became The Great Gatsby, arguably Fitzgerald’s finest work and certainly the book for which he is best known. A portrait of the Jazz Age in all of its decadence and excess, Gatsby captured the spirit of the author’s generation and earned itself a permanent place in American mythology. Self-made, self-invented millionaire Jay Gatsby embodies some of Fitzgerald’s–and his country’s–most abiding obsessions: money, ambition, greed, and the promise of new beginnings. Gatsby’s rise to glory and eventual fall from grace becomes a kind of cautionary tale about the American Dream.

It’s also a love story, of sorts, the narrative of Gatsby’s quixotic passion for Daisy Buchanan. The pair meet five years before the novel begins, when Daisy is a legendary young Louisville beauty and Gatsby an impoverished officer. They fall in love, but while Gatsby serves overseas, Daisy marries the brutal, bullying, but extremely rich Tom Buchanan. After the war, Gatsby devotes himself blindly to the pursuit of wealth by whatever means–and to the pursuit of Daisy, which amounts to the same thing. “Her voice is full of money,” Gatsby says admiringly, in one of the novel’s more famous descriptions. His millions made, Gatsby buys a mansion across Long Island Sound from Daisy’s patrician East Egg address, throws lavish parties, and waits for her to appear. When she does, events unfold with all the tragic inevitability of a Greek drama, with detached, cynical neighbor Nick Carraway acting as chorus throughout.

Thoughts:

I have been meaning to read The Great Gatsby for some time now, so I’m glad I was inspired to read it recently. It’s not a long read, or hard to read so it was perfect to slot in between reads! I thought it was an enjoyable enough read, but I didn’t feel blown away by it. I think it’s because it was so short, I didn’t really have time to get invested in the story like I enjoy doing. Others feel like it’s the perfect length, so don’t feel put off by me not feeling like it was long enough!

I thought the narrator of the story, Nick Carraway was an intriguing narrator. He comes into contact with Gatbsy as he is his neighbour and is invited to one of Gatsby’s social gatherings. It doesn’t take long for everything to kick off.

Although this is a short read, it is full of depth and interesting insights into the human condition. I thought F.Scott Fitzgerald’s writing was beautiful and truly believe that this is a classic well worth checking out.

Would I recommend it?:
Yes! 3.5 stars