Round up of Challenges 2016- How did I do?

Finishing The Series Challenge 2016

I have been working on finishing series for a few years now and I joined in with this challenge which was hosted by Bea’s Book Nook (Finishing The Series )

I signed up for the experienced challenge which meant that I aimed to finish between 3-6 series.

I finished:

I did add on Bad Girls Don’t Die because I couldn’t get on with my original pick which was The Wolves of Mercy Falls by Maggie Stiefvater. I was really pleased to finish these series and I’ll definitely be looking at a similar challenge for 2017.

The British Books Challenge 2016

This was hosted by Kirsty at Overflowing Library. I read 66 British books in 2016! I will be continuing this challenge into 2017. It’s one of my favourites!

Banned Books 2016

My sister Beth and I read 12 more Banned Books this year. On every last Monday of a month we read a banned/challenged book and we talk about the reasons why!

  1. Persepolis– Marjane Satrapi
  2. It’s Perfectly Normal– Robie H.Harris and Michael Emberley
  3. Saga, Volume 1– Brian K.Vaughan and Fiona Staples
  4. A Stolen Life– Jaycee Dugard
  5. Drama– Raina Telgemeier
  6. The Adventures of Captain Underpants– Dav Pilkey
  7. A Bad Boy Can Be Good For A Girl– Tanya Lee Stone
  8. Bless Me, Ultima– Rudolfo Anaya
  9. Bone– Jeff Smith
  10. The Glass Castle– Jeannette Walls
  11. Gossip Girl– Cecily von Ziegesar
  12. My Sister’s Keeper– Jodi Picoult

It’s been a great year of reading challenges which I feel really vary my reading choices. I’m hoping for more of the same in 2017.

Banned Books #22 A Stolen Life by Jaycee Dugard

Banner made by Luna @ Lunaslittlelibrary

Welcome to our Banned Books feature where this month we’ve read A Stolen Life by Jaycee Dugard.

A Stolen Life

Synopsis:

In the summer of 1991 I was a normal kid. I did normal things. I had friends and a mother who loved me. I was just like you. Until the day my life was stolen.
For eighteen years I was a prisoner. I was an object for someone to use and abuse.

For eighteen years I was not allowed to speak my own name. I became a mother and was forced to be a sister. For eighteen years I survived an impossible situation.

On August 26, 2009, I took my name back. My name is Jaycee Lee Dugard. I don’t think of myself as a victim. I survived.

A Stolen Life is my story—in my own words, in my own way, exactly as I remember it.

banned books

First published: 2011
In the Top Ten most frequently challenged books in 2014 (source)
Reasons: drugs/alcohol/smoking, offensive language, sexually explicit and unsuited for age group.

Do you understand or agree with any of the reasons for the book being challenged when it was originally published?

BETH: Not really, no. Because this book is a memoir of something terrible that actually happened to an eleven year old child I think it’s a really important read that more people should be aware of. I was slightly surprised (and quite horrified) at how explicit the book was in points and that’s the only reason why I would hesitate for it to be used in a classroom environment with younger children. For older teenagers – definitely yes, it should be available and recommended by a librarian or a teacher.

CHRISSI:  Yes and no. In a classroom environment with young teenagers- yes. I understand. I know it’s something that shouldn’t be shied away from, it really happened and it does happen, but I worry that it’s too sensitive an issue to discuss in a classroom. However, if a teacher did want to take it on then I would have the utmost respect for them as I think it’s a book that should be explored. I definitely think it should be recommended to older teenagers. It’s important that it’s read and discussed as it contains so many sensitive subjects that need to be identified in a safe environment.

How about now?

BETH: This is a fairly recent release (2011) so I don’t believe things have changed much in the past five years. One of the reasons given for challenging the book i.e. that it contains drugs/alcohol/smoking I feel is quite ridiculous as I don’t think teenagers should be sheltered from things that clearly happen in the outside world and may give them vital information that they can learn from to help them make informed choices about such things.

CHRISSI: I think the only reason why I have doubts about this book is because it is such a harrowing read and could potentially trigger individuals that have experienced similar things. For being banned for drugs/alcohol and smoking- I totally disagree. Teenagers and young adults experience these things in every day life. Why hide from it?

What did you think of this book?:

BETH: I’d hesitate to say I “enjoyed” it as at points it was quite a harrowing read – especially when Jaycee was first kidnapped. The length of time she was held, the childhood she lost and the sexual abuse that she had to suffer was truly terrifying. It was interesting to read her journal entries and try to figure out the mind-set of her kidnapper who was obviously mentally disturbed in quite a few ways. It’s a hugely important read that I think teenagers should be exposed to and I commend the bravery of the author in speaking out about her traumatic experience.

CHRISSI: I can’t say that I ‘enjoyed’ it, like Beth says. It was hard to read at times. It was incredibly explicit. I hated reading about the way she was treated and how her childhood was stolen. However, it is such an important read!

Would you recommend it?:

BETH: But of course!
CHRISSI: Of course!

 

This Week In Books #30

I am joining in with the lovely Lipsy from Lipsy’s Lost and Found’s feature which highlights our week in books. I shall be sharing what I’m reading now, then and next! I won’t be showcasing my new books as I do that on a Saturday. I’m really excited by this feature as I loved sharing my recent reads. My book reviews published on my blog are often WAY behind what I’m actually reading, so this is a good feature to keep you up to date!

As ever, click on the book image to get to Goodreads!

The Accidental Life Of Greg Millar The Year We Fell Apart A Stolen Life

NOWThe Accidental Life Of Greg MillarAimee Alexander– I’m just about to start this book as a request from the author. It sounds like it’s going to be an interesting piece of contemporary women’s fiction.

THENThe Year We Fell Apart- Emily Martin– I enjoyed reading this book, although I did expect it to be sadder than it was. That’s not a criticism, I just expected to weep!

NEXTA Stolen Life Jaycee Dugard– This is the next book in the Banned Books feature that I do with my sister, Beth. I’d never heard of this month’s read, so I’m intrigued.

What are you reading this week? Feel free to leave your answers in the comments or a link to a similar post!

BANNED BOOKS- the 2016 reads are revealed!

Banner made by Luna @ Lunaslittlelibrary

Beth and I have really enjoyed reading Banned Books and with the amount of Banned Books out there, there’s certainly scope for us to continue reading them. We get the lists from the American Library Association. For the books read so far in this challenge check HERE. Here are the 2016 reading choices:

JANUARY – Persepolis- Marjane Satrapi

FEBRUARY – It’s Perfectly Normal-Robie Harris

MARCH – Saga Volume 1- Brian Vaughan and Fiona Staples

APRIL – A Stolen Life- Jaycee Dugard

MAY – Drama- Raina Telgemeier

JUNE -Captain Underpants- Dave Pilkey

JULY – A Bad Boy Can Be Good For A Girl- Tanya Lee Stone

AUGUST – Bless Me Ultima- Rudolfo Anaya

SEPTEMBER – Bone- Jeff Smith

OCTOBER – The Glass Castle- Jeanette Walls

NOVEMBER- Gossip Girl-  Cecily Von Ziegesar

DECEMBER – My Sister’s Keeper- Jodi Picoult