Truth Or Dare

Truth or Dare

How did I get it?:
Received from Walker Books! Many thanks to them.

Previously reviewed by the same author:
Trouble
Remix
Unboxed

Synopsis:

How far is too far when it comes to the people you love? Claire Casey hates being the centre of attention. But if it means getting Sef Malik to notice her, it’s a risk she’s happy to take. Sef is prepared to do anything to help his recently disabled brother. But this means putting Claire’s love – and life – on the line. Because when you’re willing to risk everything, what is there left to lose?

Thoughts:

I do so love Non Pratt’s writing, so when I had the opportunity to read Truth Or Dare I jumped at the chance. Non Pratt is absolutely fantastic at representing teens. She just gets it and her books are raw, truthful and utterly relatable. Even if you’re not a teenager, her writing brings you right back to those teenage years. She is also fantastic at representing a diverse range of people.

Truth or Dare centres around Sef and Claire. Sef and Claire decide to open up a YouTube channel to raise money for Sef’s brother who has had a traumatic brain injury. The idea for videos is to complete ‘Truth or Dares’ where the viewers donate money to see certain dares. The money will go towards therapy for Sef’s brother. As a reader, we hear from Claire and Sef’s point of view. We follow Claire first and then flip the book over for Sef’s point of view.

This book is and isn’t easy to read. Its subject matter makes it challenging to read, but it’s completely engrossing at the same time. Kam’s disability is obviously at the core of the story, Sef is really struggling to deal with the extent of his big brother’s injury. Other diverse elements include Claire’s best friend Seren being asexual. I had never read this in a book before, so I was really happy to see it included in a young adult book. As well as disability and sexuality being represented, Sef isn’t a white British character. Despite this book covering so many diverse subjects, it never feels like its diversity is being shoved down your throat. It’s subtle, it’s realistic and it’s wonderful.

I think this book would appeal to young adults and adults alike. There’s something in there for everyone.

Would I recommend it?:
Of course!

A fabulous, realistic read!

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